Who We Are

A Synopsis of What Has Been Accomplished, What Is Hoped for, and Why You Should Consider Supporting in Whatever Way You Can this Effort of HSCs to Get Organized

  • Many HSCs have been hoping to be better organized for well over 25 yrs or more.​

  • The revival of serious efforts to become better organized began in 2011 with a collaborative process with government to examine the ‘community based service sector’, sometimes called the ‘community care sector’.​

  • This sector employs nearly 12000 workers throughout NB, of which HSCs number approximately 2500-3000 in the residential, ESSP (formerly known as ADAPT), attendant care and family support agencies.​

  • This sector has been neglected by government budgets for too long. For example between 2002 and 2012 Social Development’s budget increased 50% while our sector received increases of 20% in some areas and no increases in most other areas. This is an example of why we have fallen too far behind the rising costs of living …

  • Wages in this sector are now recognized to be some of the lowest in Canada for similar work.

  • As a result of these recent efforts to become better organized and to effectively engage government there has been some slight improvement which at best is considered only a beginning:

    • It is now acknowledged by government that employees working in this sector are indispensable for the provision of both social and health services;
    • A high level provincial steering committee was formed in 2015 as a forum for engaging government on issues of quality of practice and fairness in working conditions;
    • As a result there has been some investment in the sector, unprecedented in recent budget cycles, increasing wages by 1.00 to 2.00/hr in some areas of employment;
    • The sector is also now recognized to be comprised of two well defined distinct occupations – human service counsellors (HSCs) and personal support workers (PSWs);
    • The HSC occupation is now a voluntary certifiable occupation under provincial legislation and regulation. This is expected to bring more credibility to the work and, it is expected, better wages and working conditions as well, i.e. a meaningful career path. However, much more needs to be done;
    • It is expected that the costs associated with employees becoming certified will be offset by government in some way yet to be determined.​
  • Much therefore has been done to provide the basis for supporting and improving the quality of services. Much more needs to be done to improve the fairness in working conditions and basic wage rates. This depends as much on what we do as human service counsellors as it does on what government does.
  • Essential for this effort is the formation of a democratic, self-funding, bi-lingual provincial employee association that focuses on the two general goals of a) quality of practice and b) fairness in working conditions.
  • This is what this effort is about – achieving a level of organization similar to LPNs, social workers, nurses, teachers, and any other respected professions or paraprofessions where there exists a meaningful career path and reasonable remuneration.
  • Employer-driven pay equity.
  • Employer-driven Coalition resulted in 2-3 pay increases.
  • We deserve no less and we ask you to join us… Together we can make a difference!
  • Become a member now! Remember, our membership numbers represent POWER!!